Mortgage Calculators – Find your perfect mortgage

Test my mortgage!
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What if I overpay?
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Stamp duty cost
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For non-first time buyers, the current Stamp Duty rates in England for your main residence are 0% of the first £125,000 of the property value; 2% of the element between £125,000 and £250,000; 5% of the element between £250,000 and £925,000; 10% of the element between £925,000 and £1,500,000; and 12% of the element above £1,500,000. As a first time buyer, there is zero stamp duty to pay on the first £300,000 of any home costing up to £500,000 and only 5% on any proportion between £300k and £500k. The current Land and Buildings Transaction Tax rates in Scotland for your main residence are 0% on the first £145,000 of the property value; 2% of the element between £145,000 and £250,000; 5% of the element between £250,000 and £325,000; 10% of the element between £325,000 and £750,000; and 12% of the element above £750,000. The current Land and Buildings Transaction Tax rates in Scotland for a property that is not your main residence are 3% on the first £145,000 of the property value; 5% of the element between £145,000 and £0,000; 8% of the element between £250,000 and £325,000; 13% of the element between £325,000 and £750,000; and 15% of the element above £750,000. For non-first time buyers, the current Stamp Duty rates in England for your main residence are 0% of the first £125,000 of the property value; 2% of the element between £125,000 and £250,000; 5% of the element between £250,000 and £925,000; 10% of the element between £925,000 and £1,500,000; and 12% of the element above £1,500,000. New rates will apply from 1st April 2018. As a first time buyer, there is zero stamp duty to pay on the first £300,000 of any home costing up to £500,000 and only 5% on any proportion between £300k and £500k. New rates will apply from 1st April 2018.
Borrowing potential
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This is only an indication of the amount you can borrow. Your current financial commitments, including regular payments you make, the amount of your house deposit and other things will affect how much you can actually borrow.